Cotton Gin inventor dies at 81

Cotton gin inventor John Colgate, the founder of the cotton gin company, died on Sunday at his home in Connecticut.

Colgate was 81.

His family said Colgate died of complications from a heart attack.

He had been hospitalized since March.

Colgal told reporters in January that the company was closing its doors in 2018.

He said the company planned to be sold by 2019.

Cotton gin was named for the gin’s inventor, Colgate.

The gin was first sold in 1902.

He also co-founded a paper company called the New England Newspaper Company.

The company closed its doors as early as 1957.

Colga told the Globe & Mail in March that he was not sure why he had decided to retire.

“There were a lot of reasons, but it was one of them,” he said.

“I don’t know why I was thinking about it in that way.”

Colgate invented the cotton-tinged gin in 1902, after years of trial and error, which eventually produced a product that was used in hundreds of other products.

He died at his family’s home in New Britain, Connecticut, about 30 miles east of New York City.

The Boston Globe reports that Colgate had a “cordial” conversation with his son on Saturday.

Colgan Colgate and his wife, Alice, died March 7, 2018.

Alice Colgate told the paper that her husband was ill and had not been able to attend the funeral.

He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Betty Colgate of New Haven, Connecticut.

He was also survived by two sons, John Colga of New London, Connecticut and Paul Colga, of New Canaan, Connecticut; and one daughter, Karen Colga.

Colgas son, Robert, told the New Haven Register that he and his father-in-law were friends.

“He was a very nice man, very nice, and his spirit will be missed,” Robert Colga said.

Alice was a successful businesswoman and a homemaker, according to the Register.

She and Colgate married in 1961 and had three children, Robert Colgas, Roberta Colgas and Paul.